PaperTouch: Grenoble INP and the CNRS invent interactive, touch sensitive and recyclable paper

Research, Innovation
On the  December 6, 2019
Researchers at LGP2* recently developed an interactive paper material that reacts to one’s touch or breath and can record and transfer data thanks to an integrated electronic circuit. This innovative paper can even light up.
Researchers at LGP2* recently developed an interactive paper material that reacts to one’s touch or breath and can record and transfer data thanks to an integrated electronic circuit. This innovative paper can even light up.

LGP2, which is affiliated with the school Grenoble INP - Pagora, is currently working to produce and commercialize PaperTouch by creating a startup that will be hosted within the Paper Processes Engineering Lab (Génie des Procédés Papetiers) and incubated at SATT Linksium.

The launch of the startup is being led by Fanny Tricot, a Grenoble INP - Pagora graduate who is currently doing her postdoctoral work at LGP2.

A paper with unique functionalities

PaperTouch paper contains sensors that react to one’s touch or breath as well as connected antennas that react to any nearby smartphone with NFC technology. The energy created by the signal lights up ultra-flat LEDs within the paper and enables a smartphone to access data stored within the paper’s integrated electronic tag.

This new technology offers many potential applications. For example, researchers at LGP2 developed multi-functional, luminous and interactive packaging geared for the luxury and cosmetics industries. They also created a paper keyboard that reacts to a user’s breath and could facilitate interactions with electronic devices for users suffering from paralysis.

PaperTouch could also be used for domotics by creating wallpaper with tactile sensors that would replace control panels in smart homes.

Bio-sourced and recyclable materials

PaperTouch is primarily made up of bio-sourced cellulose fibers that ensure this interactive material is compatible with paper/cardboard recycling procedures. The electronic circuit is sandwiched between two wet pieces of paper which become a unique piece of paper upon drying. At the end of its life cycle, PaperTouch has no adhesives. When soaked in water, its cellulose fibers separate from the electronic components and break up.

Research at LGP2 focuses on the transformation and valorization of organic biomass (e.g., bio-refineries), the creation of bio-sourced materials (paper, cardboard, composite materials, films, non-woven materials, etc.), and printing processes to add functionalities to various surfaces. Researchers also study processes that use less energy and raw materials in order to implement green chemistry for functional materials.

The LGP2 team includes 21 permanent researcher staff and 35 doctoral, postdoctoral and temporary team members. On average, the lab files 7 patents per year.


PaperTouch

PaperTouch

* Laboratoire du génie des procédés papetiers - Grenoble INP / CNRS
Published on  February 25, 2020
Updated on February 25, 2020